squeakysquoo

jackhammersamurai:

southpauz:

True story.

When I was in 7th Grade, I almost set an Elementary School on fire while trying to microwave a cookie.

I was working at the concessions stand during a basketball tournament (my team was required to work because the tournament was being hosted in my School district), and, because I was hungry, I decided to use the microwave to heat up my cookie. My teeth were very sore due to me getting dental braces that week, so I decided to microwave it for a minute so it could be really soft.

It set on fire. 

The smoke alarm went off throughout the school.

The sprinkler system went off.

Basketball games that were going on at the time were cancelled.

Everyone had to evacuate the school and wait for the Police and Fire Department to show up. 

I JUST WANTED A COOKIE.

I evacuated my dorm doing something similar a year ago

90 people were standing outside, it was winter

That’s why everyone in this dorm knows my name

fizgig1202
fizgig1202:

bitchville:

Turns out the jellyfish can’t go in a regular fish tank because they get sucked into the filtration intakes and liquefied. In this tank, however, the water flow is carefully designed so jellies do not get sucked into pump intakes. The tanks do not contain any rocks, plants or other fish that could damage the delicate tissue of the jellyfish. The aesthetic style is a display of modern minimalism that is very distinct from a regular fish tank.  Yes, all of our jellyfish are saltwater species.
Contrary to popular belief, a saltwater aquarium is not any more difficult to maintain than a freshwater aquarium. It requires only a few extra minutes every two weeks to measure and adjust the salinity. 
A jellyfish tank is easier to maintain than a regular fish aquarium. Jellyfish have a lower metabolism than fish so only small filtration units are required for jellyfish. Additionally, jellyfish tanks do not have any rocks, plants or corals, which are difficult to prune and clean. The jellyfish must be fed once a day and 25% of the water must be changed every two weeks. 
The package comes with custom LEDs that cause the translucent jellyfish to glow. Colored lights can be used to make the jellyfish glow different colors.

Waaaaant

fizgig1202:

bitchville:

Turns out the jellyfish can’t go in a regular fish tank because they get sucked into the filtration intakes and liquefied. In this tank, however, the water flow is carefully designed so jellies do not get sucked into pump intakes. The tanks do not contain any rocks, plants or other fish that could damage the delicate tissue of the jellyfish. The aesthetic style is a display of modern minimalism that is very distinct from a regular fish tank.  Yes, all of our jellyfish are saltwater species.

Contrary to popular belief, a saltwater aquarium is not any more difficult to maintain than a freshwater aquarium. It requires only a few extra minutes every two weeks to measure and adjust the salinity. 

A jellyfish tank is easier to maintain than a regular fish aquarium. Jellyfish have a lower metabolism than fish so only small filtration units are required for jellyfish. Additionally, jellyfish tanks do not have any rocks, plants or corals, which are difficult to prune and clean. The jellyfish must be fed once a day and 25% of the water must be changed every two weeks. 

The package comes with custom LEDs that cause the translucent jellyfish to glow. Colored lights can be used to make the jellyfish glow different colors.

Waaaaant